3 Keys For Success As A Divorced Dad

children of divorceThe biggest fear that many fathers have going into the divorce process is that splitting apart the family will reduce the role they play in their kids’ lives.

Children of divorce face plenty of challenges, and it can be crippling if one parent ends up alienated out of their lives.

In many cases, these fears are warranted. Due to unfair and outdated gender stereotypes, fathers have historically gotten the short end of the stick when it comes to child custody decisions.

That is why it is critical, as soon as you realize you are headed toward divorce, to get in touch with a family law attorney who focuses on protecting fathers’ rights. A divorce attorney who understands the specific challenges dads face during the divorce process is going to be better positioned to help you achieve your goals in family court.

Cordell & Cordell understands the concerns men face during divorce.

Fortunately, the shared parenting movement has made much progress and is continuing to make headway in restructuring state child custody statutes, so that both parents remain an active part of their children’s lives. This is critical for children of divorce as shared parenting is proven to be the best post-divorce arrangement for children.

Even if your time with your child is limited, here are some things you can do to be the best divorced dad you can be.

Commit to co-parenting with your ex

More than likely, you and your ex have your share of disagreements. That is fine since you are no longer married to this person, but you still have to co-parent, and finding an arrangement that works for both of you is in the best interest of your children.

Remain flexible, do what you can to cooperate, and work your hardest to communicate clearly and effectively. The two of you might consider co-parenting counseling to help you figure out a workable system.

Since co-parenting involves two people, you only have so much control. If your ex is especially difficult, look into a parallel parenting arrangement, which is a high-conflict model of co-parenting for couples who cannot get along.

Stay engaged

Many of the risks children of divorce face can be mitigated by having an active and engaged father.

Many of the risks children of divorce face can be mitigated by having an active and engaged father. Click To Tweet

To some extent, your involvement is going to be limited by your child custody arrangement. However, there are some things you can do to get the most out of your parenting time even if it is far less than you would like.

Do not fixate on making every outing with your child some major event. When you do that, you run the risk of becoming a “Disneyland dad.”

Instead, focus your efforts on simpler gestures. Help them with their homework. Make sure you know what they have going on at school. Play catch in the backyard.

Gameday Coffee is an organization whose entire mission is focused on fostering intentional, purposeful, one-on-one time between parents and children. The point being that even something as simple as a shared cup of coffee can be meaningful as long as you are present with your child.

Get your child help

Children of divorce face major changes even if their parents do everything possible to shield them from conflict and commit to co-parenting together. There are probably questions about your divorce your child is not comfortable asking, and to help them cope with the emotions they are experiencing you might need to enlist outside help.

As much as you and your ex love your child, there are some things they may just not feel comfortable talking to you about. Be sure to communicate with your child’s teachers, close friends, family members, and other people who are around your child a lot, to be on the lookout for unusual behavior.

If that is the case, you should consider enlisting the help of a licensed counselor or therapist to help your child transition through this process. Their professional expertise can help them gain valuable insight into what your child is experiencing, and they can give you the tools you need to help them through this adjustment.

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Shawn Garrison is an Online Editor for Lexicon, focusing on subjects related to the legal services of customers, Cordell & Cordell and Cordell & Cordell UK. He has written countless pieces dealing with the unique child custody and divorce issues that men and fathers face. Through his work on CordellCordell.com, CordellCordell.co.uk, and DadsDivorce.com, Mr. Garrison has become an authority on the complexities of the legal experience and was a content creator for the YouTube series “Dad’s Divorce Live” and additional videos on both the Dad’s Divorce and Cordell & Cordell YouTube channels. Mr. Garrison has managed the sites of these customers, and fostered the creation of several of their features, including the Cordell & Cordell attorney and office pages, the Dad’s Divorce Newsletter, and the Cordell & Cordell newsletter.

One comment on “3 Keys For Success As A Divorced Dad

    I’ve been married going on 20yrs. My wife has always controlled me and my money and credit. Which she has ruined. I want my contol back. I want to know if I can legally have my paychecks direct deposited into my own account and give her what she needs to pay bills with and so I can keep the leftovers to feel secure about where my money is going? She doesn’t like my offer and wants to fight me over my idea. She just inherited $33k. Shortly after we got married we moved into her Mom’s condo, which she gets handed to her after it’s been paid for. I was told shortly after we took it over that it would be paid for after 12yrs. It’s been 14yrs of living there and I keep getting told every year the same song and dance: “its paid off in another year” We’ve talked about selling and even had it up for sale once. Her and the mother-in-law pulled it off the market once there was an offer on it. It was all to be sold so that we could continue to grow as a family by buying a house. I don’t have a retirement plan or nothing because of these two. I also have a daughter that is a cancer patient. She has had various tumors removed from the back of her head and even had a stroke. This all happened when she was 6 yrs old, now she is 17 yrs old. She told me if I did leave my marriage from her mother she would understand and told me that she would live with me instead of her mother. If none of this happened to my daughter, I would of left a long time ago. I just need some legal advice and for my mind to be at peace. I want to divorce, but can’t financially make it on one income. Also even when the deed/title gets transferred over won’t, it probably will be held due to extra protection on my wife’s behalf. So I can be shoved out the door with nothing since I talked about divorcing years ago. Thanks for your time and look forward to your advice.

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